Mortgage Servicing Fraud
occurs post loan origination when mortgage servicers use false statements and book-keeping entries, fabricated assignments, forged signatures and utter counterfeit intangible Notes to take a homeowner's property and equity.
Articles |The FORUM |Law Library |Videos | Fraudsters & Co. |File Complaints |How they STEAL |Search MSFraud |Contact Us
Texas
Negatives:
1. Homeowner would need to use caution arguing the points of any report as the argument could be seen as admission of a valid secured indebtedness.
2. Appears the report only provides information as to whether one would qualify for a modification.
3. The report does not appear that it would offer any support in litigation.

Positives:
1. The example report reviewed did provide information showing a possible conflict as to who the holder of the note is with rights to enforce.
2. The example report in referencing the security trust also revealed that the security securing the note(s) may not be in compliance with all applicable laws.

Non Relevance: The example report offered information that the trust may not have been created in compliance with all applicable laws.

Regardless of the positive and the negatives, major caution is in order.

This is not legal advice and advise, seek competent legal counsel that understands the full implications.

Quote 0 0
Bill

Texas wrote:
Negatives:
1. Homeowner would need to use caution arguing the points of any report as the argument could be seen as admission of a valid secured indebtedness.
2. Appears the report only provides information as to whether one would qualify for a modification.
3. The report does not appear that it would offer any support in litigation.

Positives:
1. The example report reviewed did provide information showing a possible conflict as to who the holder of the note is with rights to enforce.
2. The example report in referencing the security trust also revealed that the security securing the note(s) may not be in compliance with all applicable laws.

Non Relevance: The example report offered information that the trust may not have been created in compliance with all applicable laws.

Regardless of the positive and the negatives, major caution is in order.

This is not legal advice and advise, seek competent legal counsel that understands the full implications.

What does the report offer that an individual cannot with a little diligence find out by themselves for free?

Quote:
Positives:
1. The example report reviewed did provide information showing a possible conflict as to who the holder of the note is with rights to enforce.
2. The example report in referencing the security trust also revealed that the security securing the note(s) may not be in compliance with all applicable laws.



 Without the testimony of the person preparing the REST how are the positives helpful at all?


Everyone needs to keep in mind this isn't a $50.00 report.  While Mr. Dix has not posted the cost (usually a red flag) when asked, the rumors on the Internet is the test runs $750.00 and up.  When you are asking several hundred dollars for a report I really would like to see something substantial and have the "expert" that prepared the report available for an affidavit or testimony. 

Until that time, I really think a defendant's money is going to be better spent on an attorney and collecting evidence to defend their home.   
Quote 0 0
Mark
My attorney is about as good as a bad Rest report.
Quote 0 0
Moose
For the REST Report promoters, the question as to experts behind it still stands, but I would now add something to the mix: 

Do you know who Michael McDevitt is? His exhaustively thorough PR machine touts him as "America's leading real estate finance and mortgage loan audit expert" as mentioned in Business Week.

Despite touting things including the REST Report, little or nothing is known other than the alleged mention in Business Week that does not actually exist on the Business Week site.

The more I find the more it smells like a promotional scheme.

Moose







Quote 0 0
Chas
Moose:

Try to find any entity with the name "Real Estate Services and Technology".  Not only are the promoters anonymous, but they seemingly haven't even created a single corporate entity or partnership that would take any credit for the technology, methodology, or inputs.

The REST Report is a scam, through and through.  Mr. Andelman is up to his eyebrows in this fraud.
Quote 0 0
Write a reply...