Mortgage Servicing Fraud
occurs post loan origination when mortgage servicers use false statements and book-keeping entries, fabricated assignments, forged signatures and utter counterfeit intangible Notes to take a homeowner's property and equity.
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George Burns
Ann

You keep missing the points that are being made.

While this is a public forum, that does not mean that any or everything should be posted. Although we have freedom of speech, no one has the right to shout "Fire" in a crowded theatre. In the same manner no one should post things that mislead or misinform or expose others to harm.

One of the reasons homeowners are distressed is because help does not seem to be readily available and there is difficulty sorting through all the confusion about foreclosure defense that they find when they search the internet. The reason for the confusion seems to be that people post anything and everything that they can think up or find. The average homeowner has no legal training or aptitude and so finds it difficult to know what is proven fact as opposed to hype or wingnut theory.

By posting unverified, unvetted and questionable material, sometimes even junk, you contribute to the confusion.

It is you who should be kind and considerate of the many readers of this Forum. Cease posting such material and help to reduce the confusion.
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ka
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Pay attention to page 24 and page 25 in the about Audit Report.
1. Page 24 the Bloomberg screen confirm that the loan is in the Trust.
2. Page 24: Per Auditor Quote This screen verifies that the note at issue has been in 15 classes and 11 of have been paid for a total of $378,947.00. The question that rises to the mind how much of this money has been applied to the borrower account.Unquote

How do we use all that info to defend the foreclosure lawsuit. Any discussion is welcome.  


Ann, it is really dismaying to many of us that you dwell at the Forum but that you seem to be unable to follow, understand or distinguish between the valid arguments and the utter nonsense.

In respect of the report you cite, the confirmation that the loan is in the trust eviscerates a defendant's case and (if the report was even admissible) would be a judicial admission of the plaintiff's right to enforce the instrument.

The application of cash flows to various trust certificate holders is wholly irrelevant to any foreclosure case and affords no defense whatsoever.  ANYONE arguing otherwise rather clearly identifies themselves not as an "expert", but rather as a charlatan.

This information is not a service to Forum participants.  The continuous provision of false, misleading, and useless information, as well as posting material of uneven quality is not a service to the Forum or to distressed borrowers.  To the contrary, it ADDS TO THE CONFUSION and makes it easier for distressed borrowers to fall victim to various scams and swindles.

These posts also undermines your own credibility and certainly calls into question your judgment.
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George Burns

Ann wrote:
How do we use all that info to defend the foreclosure lawsuit. Any discussion is welcome.

That is a major thing that is missing. None of the advocates of these reports seem to be able to say exactly how or when to use them.

What is the point of having a report with information that you do not know how to or cannot use?
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I'm inclined to thing that securitization audits are scams. Learn as much as you can about securitization and how it works.

Best case scenario, you ask the right questions during discovery, make them produce documentation such as your pooling and servicing agreement. Find books that you can use that will support your explanation of how securitization works and the pooling and servicing agreement will back that up.

If you have to have an expert during trial, hire a securitization expert who has a CFA?

Securitization is complicated. You need a clear explanation given by someone who is an expert. I don't think you can be your own expert.
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I'm inclined to thing that securitization audits are scams. Learn as much as you can about securitization and how it works.

Best case scenario, you ask the right questions during discovery, make them produce documentation such as your pooling and servicing agreement. Find books that you can use that will support your explanation of how securitization works and the pooling and servicing agreement will back that up.

If you have to have an expert during trial, hire a securitization expert who has a CFA?

Securitization is complicated. You need a clear explanation given by someone who is an expert. I don't think you can be your own expert.
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factman

securitization audits + securitization expert =  "I'm inclined to thing that securitization audits are scams."

Thus, anyone who suggests "hire a securitization expert who has a CFA?" = the scam artist! = Barbara


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