Mortgage Servicing Fraud
occurs post loan origination when mortgage servicers use false statements and book-keeping entries, fabricated assignments, forged signatures and utter counterfeit intangible Notes to take a homeowner's property and equity.
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Digger

Has anybody heard of a judge being called a “third party?”  In other words, if a judge is acting without jurisdiction, and are therefore trespassing on the court, can they be considered a third party?  

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BISHOP
IF A STATE COURT JUDGE is hearing and ruling on a case even though the evidence presented to the court clearly shows that the plaintiff is not the real party in interest or does not have actual authority from the real party in interest to exercise the COURT'S JURISDICTION to hear the case, a Petition for relief from the State Supreme Court in the state may be filed for a nominal fee.

If a STATE COURT IS ATTEMPTING TO ACT WITHOUT LEGITIMATE AUTHORITY TO DO SO, a WRIT OF PROHIBITION may be sought by the defendant from the Supreme Court.

In such a filing the STATE COURT JUDGE IS NAMED AS A "NOMINAL PARTY" sometimes referred to as a third party.

If the State Supreme Court does not grant the relief specified, the litigant may bring an action in the U.S. District Court for relief under 42 U.S.C. 1983 specifying the violation of the defendant's rights to due process of law under the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The STATE COURT JUDGE would be named as a nominal party or THIRD PARTY in the complaint and the RELIEF REQUESTED would be for injunctive relief prohibiting the STATE COURT JUDGE FROM rendering a judgment over any action taken in the State Court proceeding.

The above is not legal advice nor has it been throughly researched on a state by state basis for existing case law on the issue of a federal court's ability to enjoin a state court from violating the due process rights of the state court party that is complaining to the U.S. District Court.
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