Mortgage Servicing Fraud
occurs post loan origination when mortgage servicers use false statements and book-keeping entries, fabricated assignments, forged signatures and utter counterfeit intangible Notes to take a homeowner's property and equity.
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Hey guys,

Since I've not been able to find an attorney in Tennessee that can spell securitization, I'm loking for some assistance since I'm Pro Se.

Anyone know anything about this course?

I would appreciate comments before I purchase.

Any better courses out there?

Thanks,
Bob 
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Moose
It's the fastest way to get up to speed on the generic legal process I think I've seen but it does not focus on debt or mortgage issues. A lot of what he provides for free is really helpful in understanding what you're up against.

The course is much like learning first aid. It doesn't make someone a surgeon or give you an understanding of blood chemistry in cardiac cases but it will keep you from making some rookie mistakes.

If you have the time to read and research other cases, I would also strongly recommend you get a PACER account. It's $0.08 per page to read case documents, but it can improve your writing skills almost instantly.  You'll also get to see what gets shot down quickly as well as develop a list of victims and attorneys who have gone into battle in your area. Most people who have been victimized are willing to share unless they've settled and signed the nefarious 'non-disclosure' agreement and are still collecting hush money. Those parts of confidential settlements are common.

Moose

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Moose,

Thanks for the info.  Anything else you might recommend?

I have had a Pacer account for several years and have read ????'s of cases. 

Bob
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Moose
Bob, I can only add that most people have never sat in a courtroom unless they've had to be on a jury or show up for a traffic violation, so it's like waking up in a Twilight Zone episode for most msfraud victims. It's hard to believe what does and doesn't hold sway.

I've suggested in a number of forums that people really do need to see the court process for themselves.  PACER is useful but it isn't a transcript of what went on and there is a chance of jumping to conclusions while a case is still going on from reading what is available on the docket. A case being tried can be tedious and boring as all get out. It will be confusing and you'll see things that seemingly don't make sense at that moment that only after some ruling is issued weeks or months later will have an explanation.

We tend to have a "Perry Mason" sense of justice and the 'good always triumphs' finality. In civil cases it's just not like that. It's a persuasion contest between attorneys in which you're simply part of the subject matter. If your case ever gets to a jury you're in the under one-half of one percent category, and lawyers argue matters of law before judges that rule on their arguments, juries only decide the facts.

Somewhere between the simplicity of television small-claims shows and the inventiveness of screenplay writers for fictional TV and movies is the mostly dull, tedious and EXPENSIVE realm of motion practice, letter writing, rule monitoring and settlement conferences.

Put it this way, you as the victim won't be up against Tiger Woods in a mortgage case, but even with a nine handicap your chances of beating a lower-tier PGA touring pro are pretty slim because in court, that card doesn't count.

Moose

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