Mortgage Servicing Fraud
occurs post loan origination when mortgage servicers use false statements and book-keeping entries, fabricated assignments, forged signatures and utter counterfeit intangible Notes to take a homeowner's property and equity.
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Hi.  Thank you for your constant enlightments,  I really appreciate it.

Question:
                If a person ordered an Investigation related to the whole process, and that
                Investigation revealed title problems: a cloud in the Title, ans is Unmarketable for a variety of reasons (robo-signer, etc).,

  What is the best way to approach to the Title Company, in order to get
   a "Commintment", or a "Letter of Declination?"

 #1...The homeowner go personally to the Title company and show them the
         report ordered, showing defects in the Title, then asking for a statement
          from the Tiltlt Co.

 #2...Go personally to the Title Co, and asking that I wonder if they can give
        the homeowner a letter of commintment, without showing the results
        of the audit on the Loan

  #3...Send them a certified letter with a copy of the audit showing title problems,
          and then asking then to issue me a letter

 The INTENTION of that is: To have one more proof that there are problems
 with the title,("Letter of Declination") and as preemptive measure to block a possible SJ.

   Any thoughts are welcomed            J.A.

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Moose
jose acosta wrote:
Hi.  Thank you for your constant enlightments,  I really appreciate it.

Question:
                If a person ordered an Investigation related to the whole process, and that
                Investigation revealed title problems: a cloud in the Title, ans is Unmarketable for a variety of reasons (robo-signer, etc).,


OK, first understand this isn't legal advice but a "person" can't "order an investigation" into anything. You can hire an auditor and obtain their analysis of your loan documents but that is not an "investigation," it's simply a professional or "expert's" opinion. You could also order (and pay for) an Abstract of Title but that may or may not uncover anything that isn't in the public record.

You can use those as the basis to file suit under some theory of damages then engage in the discovery process to obtain evidence.

On an insured title, any challenge to the validity of it would ordinarily be defended by the insurer so how that would "block" a summary judgment is at best, questionable.

Moose







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