Mortgage Servicing Fraud
occurs post loan origination when mortgage servicers use false statements and book-keeping entries, fabricated assignments, forged signatures and utter counterfeit intangible Notes to take a homeowner's property and equity.
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Nye Lavalle
Lender Tells Judge It ‘Recreated’ Letters

By GRETCHEN MORGENSON
Published: January 8, 2008
The Countrywide Financial Corporation fabricated documents related to the bankruptcy case of a Pennsylvania homeowner, court records show, raising new questions about the business practices of the giant mortgage lender at the center of the subprime mess.

The documents — three letters from Countrywide addressed to the homeowner — claimed that the borrower owed the company $4,700 because of discrepancies in escrow deductions. Countrywide’s local counsel described the letters to the court as “recreated,” raising concern from the federal bankruptcy judge overseeing the case, Thomas P. Agresti.

“These letters are a smoking gun that something is not right in Denmark,” Judge Agresti said in a Dec. 20 hearing in Pittsburgh.

The emergence of the fabricated documents comes as Countrywide confronts a rising tide of complaints from borrowers who claim that the company pushed them into risky loans. The matter in Pittsburgh is one of 300 bankruptcy cases in which Countrywide’s practices have come under scrutiny in western Pennsylvania.

Judge Agresti said that discovery should proceed so that those involved in the case, including the Chapter 13 trustee for the western district of Pennsylvania and the United States trustee, could determine how Countrywide’s systems might generate such documents.

A spokesman for the lender, Rick Simon, said: “It is not Countrywide’s policy to create or ‘fabricate’ any documents as evidence that they were sent if they had not been. We believe it will be shown in further discovery that the Countrywide bankruptcy technician who generated the documents at issue did so as an efficient way to convey the dates the escrow analyses were done and the calculations of the payments as a result of the analyses.”

The documents were generated in a case involving Sharon Diane Hill, a homeowner in Monroeville, Pa. Ms. Hill filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy protection in March 2001 to try to save her home from foreclosure.

After meeting her mortgage obligations under the 60-month bankruptcy plan, Ms. Hill’s case was discharged and officially closed on March 9, 2007. Countrywide, the servicer on her loan, did not object to the discharge; court records from that date show she was current on her mortgage.

But one month later, Ms. Hill received a notice of intention to foreclose from Countrywide, stating that she was in default and owed the company $4,166.

Court records show that the amount claimed by Countrywide was from the period during which Ms. Hill was making regular payments under the auspices of the bankruptcy court. They included “monthly charges” totaling $3,840 from November 2006 to April 2007, late charges of $128 and other charges of almost $200.

A lawyer representing Ms. Hill in her bankruptcy case, Kenneth Steidl, of Steidl and Steinberg in Pittsburgh, wrote Countrywide a few weeks later stating that Ms. Hill had been deemed current on her mortgage during the period in question. But in May, Countrywide sent Ms. Hill another notice stating that her loan was delinquent and demanding that she pay $4,715.58. Neither Mr. Steidl nor Julia Steidl, who has also represented Ms. Hill, returned phone calls seeking comment.

Justifying Ms. Hill’s arrears, Countrywide sent her lawyer copies of three letters on company letterhead addressed to the homeowner, as well as to Mr. Steidl and Ronda J. Winnecour, the Chapter 13 trustee for the western district of Pennsylvania.

The Countrywide letters were dated September 2003, October 2004 and March 2007 and showed changes in escrow requirements on Ms. Hill’s loan. “This letter is to advise you that the escrow requirement has changed per the escrow analysis completed today,” each letter began.

But Mr. Steidl told the court he had never received the letters. Furthermore, he noticed that his address on the first Countrywide letter was not the location of his office at the time, but an address he moved to later. Neither did the Chapter 13 trustee’s office have any record of receiving the letters, court records show.

When Mr. Steidl discussed this with Leslie E. Puida, Countrywide’s outside counsel on the case, he said Ms. Puida told him that the letters had been “recreated” by Countrywide to reflect the escrow discrepancies, the court transcript shows. During these discussions, Ms. Puida reduced the amount that Countrywide claimed Ms. Hill owed to $1,500 from $4,700.

Under questioning by the judge, Ms. Puida said that “a processor” at Countrywide had generated the letters to show how the escrow discrepancies arose. “They were not offered to prove that they had been sent,” Ms. Puida said. But she also said, under questioning from the court, that the letters did not carry a disclaimer indicating that they were not actual correspondence or that they had never been sent.

A Countrywide spokesman said that in bankruptcy cases, Countrywide’s automated systems are sometimes overridden, with technicians making manual adjustments “to comply with bankruptcy laws and the requirements in the jurisdiction in which a bankruptcy is pending.” Asked by Judge Agresti why Countrywide would go to the trouble of “creating a letter that was never sent,” Ms. Puida, its lawyer, said she did not know.

“I just, I can’t get over what I’m being told here about these recreations,” Judge Agresti said, “and what the purpose is or was and what was intended by them.”

Ms. Hill’s matter is one of 300 bankruptcy cases involving Countrywide that have come under scrutiny by Ms. Winnecour, the Chapter 13 trustee in Pittsburgh. On Oct. 9, she asked the court to sanction Countrywide, contending that the company had lost or destroyed more than $500,000 in checks paid by homeowners in bankruptcy from December 2005 to April 2007.

Ms. Winnecour said in court filings that she was concerned that even as Countrywide had misplaced or destroyed the checks, it levied charges on the borrowers, including late fees and legal costs. A spokesman in her office said she would not comment on the Hill case.

O. Max Gardner III, a lawyer in North Carolina who represents troubled borrowers, says that he routinely sees lenders pursue borrowers for additional money after their bankruptcies have been discharged and the courts have determined that the default has been cured and borrowers are current. Regarding the Hill matter, Mr. Gardner said: “The real problem in my mind when reading the transcript is that Countrywide’s lawyer could not explain how this happened.”

Copies of letters

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/08/business/Countrywide_Letters.pdf

Transcript

http://graphics8.nytimes.com//images/2008/01/08/business/Countrywide_Transcript.pdf


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Transcript of the Status Conference

I have a transcript of the status conference of 20 Dec 2007 In Re Sharon Dinae HILL, Case No. 01-22574, UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT, WESTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA.

If anybody desires to have a copy let me know and I will e-mail it to you in Adobe Acrobat format.
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Pinocchio

It was only a little fabrication, your Honor, just several thousands of dollars.  This is totally unrelated to all of our other fabrications.  And we had always intended to tell opposing counsel right away if we were caught!

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What does this say about the Lawyers that represent them?  What price if any? Will they pay?

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noodles
their souls to the devil.

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From my perspective, it's amazing to me how long these scams have gone on...

Below you will see some schemes I identified in my AAMA report in 1999 on pages 25 and 26. Look at #26 as prime example...


2. Changing, Redacting, Altering, Replacing, Whiting
Out, Misstating, Mislabeling Or
Mischaracterizing Transactions In A Borrower’s
Loan Or Escrow Account History That Are Different
Than Other Histories In Time Or The
Master Loan History And General Ledger;

3. Changing, Redacting, Altering, Replacing, Whiting
Out, Misstating, Mislabeling Or
Mischaracterizing Transactions In A Borrower’s
Loan Or Escrow Account History That Are Different
Than Other Histories In Time Or The
Master Loan History And General Ledger;

6. Creating False, Fraudulent Or Dummy Bookkeeping
Transactions In A Borrower’s Loan Or
Escrow Account;

7. Creating False, Fraudulent Or Dummy Credit
Or Debit Transactions In A Borrower’s Loan Or Escrow Account;

10. Demand Of Expenses And Fees Not Obligated
For;

11. Failing To Identify Charges Made To A
Borrower’s Account On Their Statements;

26. Placing Debts, Charges, Payments And Fees That
Were Previously Discharged By A Federal Bankruptcy
Court Back Into The Borrower’s Account
As A Misc. Escrow Adjustment;

29. Providing Fraudulent, Altered Or Incomplete
Account Histories To The Borrower;
30. Providing The Borrower With Notices Of Inflated
Payoffs Or Demands;



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Nye I could not agree more, why so damn long? Its only a matter of time now the rest begin showing up.
 
Litton Loans operation and CBASS pending case's are now before both state and federal courts,  My good buddies, Larry Sr. and Larry Jr, Benny Hibler, Janice, and the others, are going to be personally deposed, some again, with several new questions as who produced numerous "Forged" documents from Litton Loan and CBASS! 
 
Nye, Yes, why so damn long?  I think it was because of the amount of money.  Getting paid off, etc.
 

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stock market

trading today was suspended early this afternoon on countrywide stock , ahead of the news report of fabricated documents.  the stock trading stopped at $ 5.76 a share , watch tomorrow , it will fall to about  zero dollars per share , insider info always up to the current ticker .

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Countrywide is bankrupt, just have not filed yet, months ago, two former directors resigned unexpectedly from the board, at the time the CEO was buying and selling the same day in many cases from 36000 shares to 76000 every two to three times a week, buying as low as 7, and same day sale in the 40's and 30's, just look at the insider trading.  CEO know exactly what was going to happen!  He is every bit as good as THE LITTON'S! May they all go to hell together!
 
I can't say much more about Countrywide, because I was requested to look into them and had a meeting last year with a number of lawyers.   I'm sure Countrywide is going to 0 or near it by tomorrow.
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Babs

Countrywide stock plummets

By ALEX VEIGA, AP Business Writer 1 hour, 54 minutes ago

 

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080108/ap_on_bi_ge/countrywide_financial

 

LOS ANGELES - Shares of Countrywide Financial Corp., the nation's largest mortgage lender, plunged Tuesday after the company denied rumors that it was planning to file for bankruptcy protection.

The stock fell $2.17, or 28.4 percent, to $5.47 on Tuesday after sinking to a 52-week low of $5.05.

In a prepared statement earlier in the day, the company said there was "no substance to the rumor that Countrywide is planning to file for bankruptcy, and we are not aware of any basis for the rumor that any of the major rating agencies are contemplating negative action relative to the company."

In morning trading, Countrywide stock dipped as low as $5.76 before the New York Stock Exchange temporarily halted trading in advance of the company's statement. The decline sent stocks overall lower.

When trading resumed, the shares rebounded somewhat before tumbling again.

The stock was shaken by a report in The New York Times that said court records show the lender fabricated documents related to a bankruptcy case of a borrower in Pennsylvania.

Other Countrywide actions in borrowers' bankruptcy cases have come under scrutiny in the past.

The U.S. Trustee launched an inquiry last fall to investigate whether the lender's claims against two South Florida borrowers seeking bankruptcy protection violated bankruptcy laws.

Investors have been particularly anxious about Countrywide in recent days. Its stock is well below its 52-week high of $45.26.

Countrywide, like many in the mortgage industry, has suffered as more customers have defaulted on home loans, particularly on those made to borrowers with questionable repayment histories.

The Calabasas, Calif.-based company reported a $1.2 billion loss in the third quarter of last year, but management forecast a profitable fourth quarter and 2008.

Wall Street analysts are skeptical the company will be able to deliver on its projection, amid ongoing home-price declines, an expected new wave of mortgage defaults this year, and lingering problems with credit markets.

 

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Moose

The universal industry mantra repeated:

 

"Countrywide, like many in the mortgage industry, has suffered as more customers have defaulted on home loans, particularly on those made to borrowers with questionable repayment histories."

 

The get-out-of-jail free card is still in play.  That's where they're all lining up - blame the borrwers with completely bogus phony credit scores that were deliberately bought from the credit reporting scammers to push otherwise qualified borrowers into scam loans that the originator knew would fail.

 

Now they get to sit back and say they only made those loans to "borrowers with questionable repayment histories" as if that was a fact. It was nothing more than a scheme to jack up interest rates and kickbacks by pointing to credit scores they knew were what they asked for and got.

 

Deliberately artificial low credit scores were nothing more than bought and paid for "reasons" to trap people into ready-to-fail subprime loans.

 

Why the credit data providers aren't being dragged into this only reflects how powerful they really are in Washington. Somehow, they are immune from scrutiny. That in and of itself shows how much power they actually have.

 

It's the power to make subprime borrowers at a whim. And the lenders needed a reason to make more and more subprime borrowers and they bought it from the credit reporters who concocted the perfect product for their customers.

 

Moose

 

 

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If Countrywide files a bankruptcy petition, that would seem to entitle it to a civil stay and would seem to preclude the necessity of ANSWERING discovery in the Western District of Pennsylvania regarding its ongoing document fabrication activities.  Come to think of it, it will preclude the necessity of answering discovery concerning fraud in Florida as well!  If Bank of America INJECTS A MASSIVE AMOUNT OF CAPITAL into Countrywide AVERTING a bankruptcy, then Countrywide will need to ANSWER on schedule. 

Who wants to BET on this outcome? 
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Stephen

Charles Schumer said today he'd like to "Boil Mozilo in hot oil".  I don't think so.

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The R word...

Bank of America (BAC: 39.30, +0.56, +1.44%) is in advanced talks to acquire Countrywide, The Wall Street Journal reported this afternoon citing unnamed sources. Shares of Countrywide surged on the news and closed more than 50% higher.

The deal is viewed as important because Countrywide is the number one originator of U.S. mortgages and Bank of America's interest shows the value that some still see in struggling financials.
Market Rides Countrywide High; Fed Talks Rate Cut
Market Committee.

"Based on that evaluation, and consistent with our dual mandate, we stand ready to take substantive additional action as needed to support growth and to provide adequate insurance against downside risks," said Bernanke in his speech in Washington, D.C.

Bernanke went well short of saying that a recession is imminent, however.

"The Federal Reserve is not currently forecasting a recession," said Bernanke in response to a question after his speech.

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Blossom
Mortgage Magic–Recreating Servicing Documents

By The Bankruptcy Lawyers | January 11, 2008

The latest uproar about mortgage servicing in bankruptcy is an admission by Countrywide that it “recreated” documents related to the servicing of a consumer’s home loan. The short story is that Countrywide says a debtor’s monthly mortgage payment changed during the Chapter 13 plan and that the debtor didn’t make the increased payments. The problem is that the debtor, her attorney, and the trustee say that they were never told about the increase in payments, which is purportedly due to changing escrow requirements. Countrywide gave the debtor letters showing that the amounts changed; those letters were dated 2003, 2004, and 2007. The problem is that those letters were not copies of actual letters from 2003, 2004, and 2007. As Countrywide admitted, it “recreated” these letters as “evidence” of the change in the monthly payment. The judge had a few questions about that practice:

From the transcript, In re Hill, Dec. 20, 2007:

11 THE COURT: Well, why wouldn’t you just show that by

12 an in-house document generated by Countrywide? Why would you

13 go to the steps of creating a letter that never was sent, which

14 appears — which could be used by a loan processor or somebody

15 at Countrywide when a debtor calls up on their own to find out

16 the background of a loan, and these letters were forwarded on

17 without the benefit of counsel or you and Mr. Steidl talking

18 about post-discharge injunction violations? Why would that

19 type of document ever even be part of this system?

20 MS. PUIDA: Your Honor, I can’t speak as to that. I

21 don’t know the answer.

The judge’s question goes right to the heart of the matter. What is going on in this system? Why can’t one of the nation’s largest banks look in its records and produce evidence that it did what it says it did? And why can’t Countrywide’s lawyer explain its servicing practices? Countrywide’s servicing technology reputedly retains images of every document that it produces for five years; these letters should be there. (And I note, it’s possible that they are, but somebody decided it would be easier/faster/better to “recreate” the evidence.) As the judge’s comments suggest, how was a consumer supposed to know these were recreations? The “recreation” only came to light in this case because one of the receipients of the letters did not move to the given address until months after the letter was sent. A letter really written at that date couldn’t have been sent there–the recipient didn’t even know they were going to relocate at that point in time. But for this quirk, the debtor could have been forced to pay more than $4,000 to Countrywide, even though that money may not be owed.

The procedural posture of the case is critically important. The consumer, Ms. Hill, filed Chapter 13 bankruptcy to save her home and, to the best of the knowledge of her counsel, her trustee, and herself made every required payment during the her repayment plan. She received a bankruptcy discharge; a court order that she had done everything necessary under bankruptcy law during that 5 year period. What happened at the moment of this “fresh start?” Countrywide refused to accept her mortgage payments and asserted that her mortgage was in default because she was behind on her payments. Ms. Hill was very, very fortunate. Her bankruptcy attorney continued to represent her and alleged that Countrywide was violating the discharge injunction. The Chapter 13 trustee in this area, the Western District of Pennsylvania, is already embroiled in a dispute with Countrywide, alleging that it lost or destroyed $500,000 in checks from bankrupt homeowners. These factors helped get Ms. Hill’s situation in front of a judge, a benefit that many homeowners facing foreclosure will never get.

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Nye Lavalle wrote:
Lender Tells Judge It ‘Recreated’ Letters

By GRETCHEN MORGENSON
Published: January 8, 2008
The Countrywide Financial Corporation fabricated documents related to the bankruptcy case of a Pennsylvania homeowner, court records show, raising new questions about the business practices of the giant mortgage lender at the center of the subprime mess.

The documents — three letters from Countrywide addressed to the homeowner — claimed that the borrower owed the company $4,700 because of discrepancies in escrow deductions. Countrywide’s local counsel described the letters to the court as “recreated,” raising concern from the federal bankruptcy judge overseeing the case, Thomas P. Agresti.

“These letters are a smoking gun that something is not right in Denmark,” Judge Agresti said in a Dec. 20 hearing in Pittsburgh.

The emergence of the fabricated documents comes as Countrywide confronts a rising tide of complaints from borrowers who claim that the company pushed them into risky loans. The matter in Pittsburgh is one of 300 bankruptcy cases in which Countrywide’s practices have come under scrutiny in western Pennsylvania.

Judge Agresti said that discovery should proceed so that those involved in the case, including the Chapter 13 trustee for the western district of Pennsylvania and the United States trustee, could determine how Countrywide’s systems might generate such documents.

A spokesman for the lender, Rick Simon, said: “It is not Countrywide’s policy to create or ‘fabricate’ any documents as evidence that they were sent if they had not been. We believe it will be shown in further discovery that the Countrywide bankruptcy technician who generated the documents at issue did so as an efficient way to convey the dates the escrow analyses were done and the calculations of the payments as a result of the analyses.”

The documents were generated in a case involving Sharon Diane Hill, a homeowner in Monroeville, Pa. Ms. Hill filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy protection in March 2001 to try to save her home from foreclosure.

After meeting her mortgage obligations under the 60-month bankruptcy plan, Ms. Hill’s case was discharged and officially closed on March 9, 2007. Countrywide, the servicer on her loan, did not object to the discharge; court records from that date show she was current on her mortgage.

But one month later, Ms. Hill received a notice of intention to foreclose from Countrywide, stating that she was in default and owed the company $4,166.

Court records show that the amount claimed by Countrywide was from the period during which Ms. Hill was making regular payments under the auspices of the bankruptcy court. They included “monthly charges” totaling $3,840 from November 2006 to April 2007, late charges of $128 and other charges of almost $200.

A lawyer representing Ms. Hill in her bankruptcy case, Kenneth Steidl, of Steidl and Steinberg in Pittsburgh, wrote Countrywide a few weeks later stating that Ms. Hill had been deemed current on her mortgage during the period in question. But in May, Countrywide sent Ms. Hill another notice stating that her loan was delinquent and demanding that she pay $4,715.58. Neither Mr. Steidl nor Julia Steidl, who has also represented Ms. Hill, returned phone calls seeking comment.

Justifying Ms. Hill’s arrears, Countrywide sent her lawyer copies of three letters on company letterhead addressed to the homeowner, as well as to Mr. Steidl and Ronda J. Winnecour, the Chapter 13 trustee for the western district of Pennsylvania.

The Countrywide letters were dated September 2003, October 2004 and March 2007 and showed changes in escrow requirements on Ms. Hill’s loan. “This letter is to advise you that the escrow requirement has changed per the escrow analysis completed today,” each letter began.

But Mr. Steidl told the court he had never received the letters. Furthermore, he noticed that his address on the first Countrywide letter was not the location of his office at the time, but an address he moved to later. Neither did the Chapter 13 trustee’s office have any record of receiving the letters, court records show.

When Mr. Steidl discussed this with Leslie E. Puida, Countrywide’s outside counsel on the case, he said Ms. Puida told him that the letters had been “recreated” by Countrywide to reflect the escrow discrepancies, the court transcript shows. During these discussions, Ms. Puida reduced the amount that Countrywide claimed Ms. Hill owed to $1,500 from $4,700.

Under questioning by the judge, Ms. Puida said that “a processor” at Countrywide had generated the letters to show how the escrow discrepancies arose. “They were not offered to prove that they had been sent,” Ms. Puida said. But she also said, under questioning from the court, that the letters did not carry a disclaimer indicating that they were not actual correspondence or that they had never been sent.

A Countrywide spokesman said that in bankruptcy cases, Countrywide’s automated systems are sometimes overridden, with technicians making manual adjustments “to comply with bankruptcy laws and the requirements in the jurisdiction in which a bankruptcy is pending.” Asked by Judge Agresti why Countrywide would go to the trouble of “creating a letter that was never sent,” Ms. Puida, its lawyer, said she did not know.

“I just, I can’t get over what I’m being told here about these recreations,” Judge Agresti said, “and what the purpose is or was and what was intended by them.”

Ms. Hill’s matter is one of 300 bankruptcy cases involving Countrywide that have come under scrutiny by Ms. Winnecour, the Chapter 13 trustee in Pittsburgh. On Oct. 9, she asked the court to sanction Countrywide, contending that the company had lost or destroyed more than $500,000 in checks paid by homeowners in bankruptcy from December 2005 to April 2007.

Ms. Winnecour said in court filings that she was concerned that even as Countrywide had misplaced or destroyed the checks, it levied charges on the borrowers, including late fees and legal costs. A spokesman in her office said she would not comment on the Hill case.

O. Max Gardner III, a lawyer in North Carolina who represents troubled borrowers, says that he routinely sees lenders pursue borrowers for additional money after their bankruptcies have been discharged and the courts have determined that the default has been cured and borrowers are current. Regarding the Hill matter, Mr. Gardner said: “The real problem in my mind when reading the transcript is that Countrywide’s lawyer could not explain how this happened.”

Copies of letters

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/08/business/Countrywide_Letters.pdf

Transcript

http://graphics8.nytimes.com//images/2008/01/08/business/Countrywide_Transcript.pdf


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YouTube CW
Countrywide Loan Investigation jameshoyer.com
Added: 3 weeks ago
Views: 77
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Here is another clue that the alarms were ringing a little more than a few months ago!
 
No one even remembers In Re Hill, EXCEPT a few veterans of this message board and long time consumer advocates.

But the Feds were so busy cobbling together the post-bankruptcy shotgun marriage of Countrywide and Bank of America, that the fact that disclosure that Countrywide was ROUTINELY FABRICATING EVIDENCE in court proceedings and that the discovery of this had actually precipitated the meltdown, was simply ignored!

So we took one thoroughly corrupt, dishonest and deceitful criminal organization, and we simply merged it into the largest bank in the country!  What a great idea!  We wouldn't want these criminals out on the street collecting unemployment!
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The Equitable One
I have nothing to add here. I just wanted to put this antique thread back on the front page and to request that folks consider:

1) The impact this case had on Countrywide and how immediate that impact was
2) That similar events are presently occurring in the NE District Louisiana BK case of In Re Wilson
3) That our Federal authorities have known for some time now that documents and evidence is/are being forged and fabricated and yet our US Attorneys General, both the prior and the current, have DONE NOTHING.

Draw your own conclusions.

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William A. Roper, Jr.
I probably erred in not appending this post to the existing thread:

The United States Attorney has entered into a settlement with the BOLES Law Firm in the In Re Wilson case:


http://www.scribd.com/doc/41737480/In-Re-Wilson-Stipulation-and-Order-27-Oct-2010


The BOLES Law Firm accepted responsibility for the unethical behavior of its attorney Clay WIRTZ and has promised not to do this any more!

As you can see, President Obama is really commited to stopping mortgage foreclosure fraud!

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William A. Roper, Jr.
Uggh!  I am CONFUSING the In Re Wilson and In Re Hill cases!

The most recent development in In Re Hill is here:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/41551941/In-Re-Hill-Memorandum-Opinion-and-Order-05-Oct-2010?in_collection=2711712


Your Comments are solicited and appreciated!
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Did anyone other than the Equitable One actually READ Judge Thomas AGRESTI's decision?

A former Bank of America Asst. General Counsel is scheduled for TRIAL next week for making false statements under oath within a deposition during the U.S. Trustee's investigation into CountryWide evidence fabrication and false statements to the Court.

This might be something to bring to the attention of your Congressman and Senator!
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In 2008 Gary posted:

" Litton Loans operation and CBASS pending case's are now before both state and federal courts,  My good buddies, Larry Sr. and Larry Jr, Benny Hibler, Janice, and the others, are going to be personally deposed, some again, with several new questions as who produced numerous "Forged" documents from Litton Loan and CBASS! "
 
Does anyone have any info as to whatever happened with Litton ?
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The In Re Hill Sanctions Hearing on imposition of sanctions on PA Attorney Leslie PUIDA and the law firm of Goldbeck, McCafferty and McGeever is this afternoon (Monday, November 22, 2010) at 2 PM in Erie, Pennsylvania.


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The Equitable One
How I would love to be there!!
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William A. Roper, Jr.
I have been remiss in sharing with the Forum the disposition of the In Re Hill sanctions against Goldbeck, McCafferty & McKeever, as well as attorney Leslie PUIDA:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/43928743/In-Re-Hill-Memorandum-and-Order-of-24-Nov-2010?in_collection=2711712


This decision was mostly ignored by the mainstream national press, though it is getting some renewed play within the context of the Loughren v. Lion et al case.  This article did appear within the Pittsburgh Tribune Review:

"Judge sanctions attorney, law firm in Monroeville case" (Tuesday, November 30, 2010)

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/s_711489.html


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