Mortgage Servicing Fraud
occurs post loan origination when mortgage servicers use false statements and book-keeping entries, fabricated assignments, forged signatures and utter counterfeit intangible Notes to take a homeowner's property and equity.
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Still Fighting
I spoke with an attorney today who said he wasn't too concerned with my Litton information but was real interested in my Ameriquest information. He told me  if he finds what he thinks is in my Ameriquest file, Litton will view me in a whole new light.He wouldn't tell me exactly what  his hunch is until he reviews my information. Are lawyers turning away from Litton because they know the well is about to run dry?
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Moose

Litton's parent entities are publicly traded and close to insolvent. But they might get any number of bottom-feeder opportunist investors to prop up a legal fight for months if not years without completely losing everything they've stolen from borrowers and investors.

Ameriquest is a privately held corporation and the small number of stockholders probably have hundreds of millions in assets, albeit mostly stashed carefully. They aren't going to get a behind the scenes rescue. And their bankruptcy may not protect those asssets.

Litton - tiny fish.

Ameriquest - wounded whale.
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That isn't necessarily true, Moose. Depending on whether the loan was bundled into a trust or not, there could very well be insurance policies in place covering the trusts that servicers are servicing. Just because Litton may not be overly liquid at the moment doesn't necessarily mean that there is nothing to be recovered from them. I know that I've seen policies attached to various trusts in coverage amounts ranging from $10 to $50 million +/-.

Additionally, I'm not sure I'd want an attorney that wasn't willing to go after the entity that may very well have caused the initial damage and subsequent avalanche - regardless of what may or may not be recovered. In this particular instance, that tells me right upfront that the attorney is looking at dollar signs first and foremost as opposed to the merits of the case.
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Right on Mike!  I heard LITTON IS RUNNING OUT OF CASH TO PAY LAWYERS, I HAVE NO IDEA IF ITS TRUE OR NOT, BUT I HAVE BEEN HEARING MORE AND MORE ABOUT IT.
 
As for other sources, your right about the insurance policies, as well as other corporate and personal assets that maybe be sought by piercing the corporate Veil.
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Here's the thing.

If you are going to sue one of these servicers and you aren't sure they have
money whether hidden or not.

You can hire a private investigator to do an asset check.  Their personal
assets are liable to be much greater than the way they have left their
company's balance sheets.

If they have assets, tie them up with a court order.  Just so that can't
dump them and run.

Nobody is going to want to litigate a case if there is no money to be had.

I'm guessing they have taken their personal cuts of the money already
and put them in the Cayman's.

Those are ill gotten gains.

They just don't simply get to plunder and keep it.

Nobody is at that point yet but you never know when that could become
an issue.



Dee
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Lawyers have always shied from taking cases against Litton even before this whole sub prime lending crisis started.  Litton would pay off  lawyers under the table to throw cases or lawyers were already in coercion with them due to business relationships. 
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