Mortgage Servicing Fraud
occurs post loan origination when mortgage servicers use false statements and book-keeping entries, fabricated assignments, forged signatures and utter counterfeit intangible Notes to take a homeowner's property and equity.
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A Cry For Christmas Justice- and SUPPORT

Dear Colleagues,

 At this time when we celebrate the birth of Jesus, I am crying for justice for the people in this country.  It is sickening the amount of wrongful foreclosures that have occurred, with not only neighbors turning their heads (“Love your neighbor as yourself.”  Matthew 22:39), but forces of evil are bottom feeding off the victimization of our brothers and sisters – foreclosure mills and document processing places that are manufacturing false documents to foreclose, judges who are seen nodding and winking at the foreclosure attorneys, packed courtrooms with people who are being handled like animals (or less), and people calling in screaming because they have been wrongfully ripped from their homes after filing wrongful foreclosure suits.  This is out of control.

    We are in a rigged system.  The events of Wall Street and greedy people inside Investment Banks, Walls Street, big Lenders, Trusts, Servicers, MERS… it has been put together in a grand scheme to steal.  I have finally figured out how to explain it.  But we need to educate folks how to strategically battle back.  It is not the “Occupy” movement.  In my opinion, they are actually distracting from the real issues and doing it violently, thereby diluting what should be the real efforts.

    Especially in Georgia, the worst foreclosure state, there has to be some “checks and balances”, a way to communicate best practices of survival in this arena, and a way to get the “light” on this horrible wrongdoing.  Evil loves the darkness.  I have seen it all, and I have had enough.

     I am crying out for help.  We need door openers, leaders, help with Internet TV set up, more man/woman power and more board members.  We have legal resources but need more hands. The few specially trained lawyers are beginning to collaborate against this monster.  But EVERYONE, including judges and state court clerks, need training because this is a speciality.  Our laws don’t even address.some issues spawning from securitization and credit default swaps. 

    We are in massive trouble.  People are being beaten up, lied to, and stolen from.  We have to educate them – quickly.  The Christmas season with all the commercialism almost makes me sick when I see people who have been stripped of shelter  - wrongfully, needlessly, just because the system planned it.  Another buck another day.

    If you give to a shelter or serve food to a shelter this season, remember that many of the people didn’t have to be there.  Children, the elderly, single mothers, veterans, fathers who did not know how to battle the system and feel failure.  You would be amazed at the professional folks who fell under the pressure.

    The good news is: we can help people fight back.  But we need real, dedicated help.   Please call in if you are willing.  Or, please donate so that we can pay for training and help.

    What a bittersweet Christmas.  What would Jesus say?
Respectfully,

Volunteer For the Mission: http://www.OperationRest.org

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cww
You are right about everything you have said.   I do not know if you will get much help here either. I will give you and people about to lose their home some free advise. From what I have seen after looking in to this for a couple of years now.  What seems to be the most affective way, for some one who can still make a payment, to save their home and not risk lots of money to lawyers who are not always getting the job done, is to file chapter 13 bankruptcy.    It may not always work in the end , but it can stop the foreclosure, make the servicers prove who owns the loan, and get them into a workout payment.   I hope this helps some people.  And Merry Christmas.
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Bill

cww wrote:
You are right about everything you have said.   I do not know if you will get much help here either. I will give you and people about to lose their home some free advise. From what I have seen after looking in to this for a couple of years now.  What seems to be the most affective way, for some one who can still make a payment, to save their home and not risk lots of money to lawyers who are not always getting the job done, is to file chapter 13 bankruptcy.    It may not always work in the end , but it can stop the foreclosure, make the servicers prove who owns the loan, and get them into a workout payment.   I hope this helps some people.  And Merry Christmas.


It really depends on your situation.  Bankruptcy will help some people if you get a good attorney (many bankruptcy attorneys "are not always getting the job done" also) but many people will benefit from fighting the foreclosure FIRST then filing bankruptcy if they don't prevail.  You are not hearing about a lot of Pro Se victories because the banks are letting a lot of cases languish when challenged.  The current model the foreclosure mills use is a kind of a "lowest hanging fruit" business model.  It is only cost effective and profitable with default judgments.  Lengthy litigation really gums up the gears. 

Large "cash for keys" offers, good modification offers, cases dismissed with prejudice, all come from homeowners FIGHTING foreclosure and not just rolling over and claiming bankruptcy.

Talk to an attorney and see what all of your options are (most of the time bankruptcy consultations are free) check with 2 or 3 attorneys.  You really need to find the right kind of attorney in regards to foreclosure or bankruptcy.  A lot of bankruptcy attorneys are NOT consumer friendly.  They consider people that have to file bankruptcy as people that can't handle their personal affairs. 

I have been fighting foreclosure for several years Pro Se with a lot of work and a lot of help from others.

NEVER underestimate what can happen with a well though out, sophisticated, defense. 
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CWW
Bill . that may be good advice in the Judicial foreclosure states where they, I think ,  automatically have to face you in court. But it is a little harder in our no-judicial states, even when it is brought to everybody's attention that it is an illegal foreclosure , the serviccers  just  keep foreclosing.  I guess you would have to file a lawsuit on your own and that gets complicated for most people.  If you can file a lawsuit on your own you could file chpt. 13 bankruptcy on your own and would prob. have more protections like an automatic stay and the creditors having to prove who owns the loan. It is also a work out plan but I think it keeps the same loan instead of signing off on something new.  But I would be very interested to hear other thoughts on this..  
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Bill

CWW wrote:
Bill . that may be good advice in the Judicial foreclosure states where they, I think ,  automatically have to face you in court. But it is a little harder in our no-judicial states, even when it is brought to everybody's attention that it is an illegal foreclosure , the serviccers  just  keep foreclosing.  I guess you would have to file a lawsuit on your own and that gets complicated for most people.  If you can file a lawsuit on your own you could file chpt. 13 bankruptcy on your own and would prob. have more protections like an automatic stay and the creditors having to prove who owns the loan. It is also a work out plan but I think it keeps the same loan instead of signing off on something new.  But I would be very interested to hear other thoughts on this..  


In case you can't tell I live in a judicial foreclosure state.  I often forget that it is increasingly more difficult for someone in a non-judicial state to even get into a court room before their house is sold.  I would have to agree, that in a non-judicial state chapter 13 may be the easiest way to stop foreclosure. 
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